Berry IJC Fellowship

Questions? Contact Ben Hunter, Dean of University Libraries, at bhunter@uidaho.edu

DEADLINE: October 3, 2021


Call for Applications

The University of Idaho Library invites students from any discipline at the University of Idaho to apply for the Berry International Jazz Collections Fellowship. This program funds one student each year to collaborate with the faculty and staff at the University of Idaho Library to increase the visibility and use of the International Jazz Collections (IJC) through work on a specific research project. Research should focus on the primary sources in the IJC, and applicants are encouraged to think creatively about the format of their research output. Past projects have taken the form of digital collections, oral histories, and digital essays created with the guidance of Library staff.

The applicant may base their research on any IJC collection. Not sure where to begin? See the the abbreviated list of collections below for project ideas.

The fellowship begins in the fall 2021 semester and will conclude with an exhibition of the student’s work at the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival in February 2022 as part of the Library’s International Jazz Collection exhibits.

The fellow should plan to spend approximately 10-15 hours per week between October and February in order to accomplish the goals of the project. This award includes a $4,000 student fellowship given as a stipend and up to $500 in research funds to help cover the cost of materials and supplies, project-related travel expenses, etc.


How to Apply

Applicants must submit:

  1. A letter of no more than 500 words detailing the proposed project; outlining how the project increases the visibility and use of the International Jazz Collections (IJC), and how your previous experience, education, and/or training prepares you for the work of this fellowship.
  2. A current resume or CV.
  3. A letter of support from a U of I faculty member. (The faculty member may assist the student in preparing the application, but the application must be the student’s own work.)

Submit an Application

Applications are due Sunday, October 3rd by midnight and a decision will be announced within two weeks of the deadline.


Applications will be judged on the following criteria:

  • Application materials are clearly written and demonstrate the applicant’s understanding of the nature and purpose of the project, how it relates to other work in the field, and it includes a plan for accomplishing project goals.
  • The project forwards the goals of increasing the visibility and use of the University of Idaho’s International Jazz Collections (IJC).
  • Proposed project allows student to take intellectual ownership and can be reasonably completed in the allotted time period.
  • Student is prepared for the project (coursework, experience, interest and ability to navigate and use primary sources, etc.)
  • Faculty member has submitted supportive recommendation.

IJC Sample Collections

Note: The following collections are suggested opportunities for research. Applicants are welcome to focus their research on other International Jazz Collections (IJC) not included in this list.

Pete and Conte Candoli Collections

  • Pete and Conte Candoli were jazz trumpeters. These collections include original music manuscripts, arrangements, musical scores, correspondence, newspaper clippings, clothing, and photographs.

Buddy Tate Collection

  • Buddy Tate was a jazz tenor saxophonist and clarinetist. This collection includes band books, performance suits, photographs, and ephemera.

Doc Cheatham Collection

  • Doc Cheatham was a jazz trumpet player. This collection contains photographs, autobiography, manuscript scores, audiotapes, clothing, and miscellaneous items.

Past Projects

image of Lester Young playing the saxophone

Leonard Feather Blindfold Tests

A digital collection of transcribed interviews between Leonard Feather and renown jazz artists.
2019 Fellow: Mitchell Gibbs

View Project

image of Doc Skinner and Lionel Hampton on stage

Oral History Interviews with Lynn "Doc" Skinner

A digital essay presenting a series of oral history interviews conducted with Doc Skinner, an influential figure in the history of the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival.
2020 Fellow: Spencer Manning

View Project